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Tuesday, July 14, 2020 | History

4 edition of A laboratory study on the phase transition for polar stratospheric cloud particles found in the catalog.

A laboratory study on the phase transition for polar stratospheric cloud particles

A laboratory study on the phase transition for polar stratospheric cloud particles

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  • 35 Currently reading

Published by National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Dryden Flight Research Center, National Technical Information Service, distributor in Edwards, Calif, [Springfield, Va .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Crystal growth,
  • Nucleation,
  • Supercooling,
  • Stratosphere,
  • Crystallization,
  • Ice clouds,
  • Cloud physics,
  • Clouds (Meteorology)

  • Edition Notes

    StatementEdward H. Teets.
    SeriesNASA contractor report -- 198056., NASA contractor report -- NASA CR-198056.
    ContributionsDryden Flight Research Facility.
    The Physical Object
    FormatMicroform
    Pagination1 v.
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17838012M
    OCLC/WorldCa40064140

    L. Nichman et al.: Phase transition observations and discrimination of small cloud particles ditions using CASPOL. Cluster analysis techniques were subsequently used to classify different types of particles ac-cording to their polarization ratios during phase transition. A classification map is presented for water droplets, organicCited by: 9. Sensitivity of polar stratospheric cloud formation to changes in study based on measurements made during the Arctic winter / Air parcel trajectories were calculated 6 days back- menting polar stratospheric cloud particles, limits the deacti-vation process of .

      A 1-D model of the formation and seasonal evolution of Polar Stratospheric Clouds (PSCs) is described. The model considers PSCs of types 1 and 2 in the vertical range from 8 to 30 km and utilizes real temperature data. The micro-physical processes included in the model are the heterogeneous nucleation and condensation (or evaporation), while sedimentation, gas diffusion and Cited by: 9.   For example, polar stratospheric clouds, which play a key role in stratospheric ozone depletion, can form by homogeneous freezing of HNO 3-H Cited by:

    The third formation mechanism of ice particles, the depo-sition from water vapour on firm SAT particles introduced in Fortin et al. () is most likely very relevant in the polar polar stratosphere. It takes place at temperatures close to the ice frost point. In the laboratory studies of Fortin et al. ()Cited by:   Nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) is an important constituent of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs).1 Balloon‐flight2, 3 as well as satellite FTIR measurements accompanied by ground‐based LIDAR observed NAT to be present as a mixture with ice.4 The homogeneous nucleation rates of NAT (upper limit 3×10 −10 (cm −3 air) h −1) are much too low for cloud formation;5, 6 therefore, heterogeneous Cited by: 6.


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A laboratory study on the phase transition for polar stratospheric cloud particles Download PDF EPUB FB2

The nucleation and growth of different phases of simulated polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) particles were investigated in the laboratory. Solutions and mixtures of solutions at concentrations 1 to 5 m (molality) of ammonium sulfate, ammonium bisulfate, sodium chloride, sulfuric acid, and nitric acid were supercooled to.

BibTeX @MISC{Jr_alaboratory, author = {Edward Teets Jr and Edward H. Teets}, title = {A Laboratory Study on the Phase Transition for Polar Stratospheric Cloud Particles}, year = {}}. Get this from a library. A laboratory study on the phase transition for polar stratospheric cloud particles.

[Edward H Teets; Dryden Flight Research Facility.]. The nucleation and growth of different phases of simulated polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) particles were investigated in the laboratory.

Solutions and mixtures of solutions at concentrations 1 to 5 m (molality) of ammonium sulfate, ammonium bisulfate, sodium chloride, sulfuric acid, and nitric acid were supercooled to prescribed temperatures below their equilibrium melting : Jr.

Edward H. Teets. A Laboratory Study on the Phase Transition for Polar Stratospheric Cloud ParticlesAuthor: Edward Teets Jr and Edward H. Teets. Heterogeneous reactions. Heterogeneous reactions are important in both the troposphere and stratosphere. In the stratosphere, polar stratospheric clouds are responsible for the formation of the Antarctic “O 3 hole”.

In the troposphere, heterogeneous reactions involving gas–liquid–solid phases are closely related to air quality problems. The reactive nitrogen (NO y), total water, and particle components of the polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) aerosol in the Arctic are studied using in situ aircraft measurements in the lower results are compared to findings from the Antarctic derived using similar measurements and Cited by:   The airborne lidar LEANDRE was deployed from Kiruna (Sweden) in January, during Phase III of the Second European Stratospheric Arctic andMid-latitude Experiment (SESAME).

Polar Stratospheric Clouds (PSC) weredetected on several flights. Four lidar retrievals, on two different days, arepresented together with the thermal history of air masses, derived from 5-daybackward trajectories Cited by: lower stratospheric ozone values (Waibel et al., ).

In the last decades, different types of PSC particles have been stud-ied (see overviews in Peter and Grooß, ; Peter, ) and ongoing research still aims to quantify their contribu-tions to polar ozone chemistry as well as the microphysical mechanisms underlying their formation.

Abstract. Liquid and solid particles in polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) have been known to play a crucial role in the chemical loss of stratospheric ozone over the Antarctic and Arctic regions in late winter and early spring. The stratospheric aerosol and cloud particles provide the sites where fast heterogeneous chemical reactions convert inactive Cited by: 2.

Polar Stratospheric Cloud Background These clouds exist at very high altitude (~70, ft) within Earth's do not normally form in the stratosphere due to its extreme dryness.

During winter at high latitudes, however, stratospheric temperature sometimes becomes low enough to promote formation of clouds. Study of finely divided aqueous systems as an aid to understanding the formation mechanism of polar stratospheric clouds: Case of HNO 3 /H 2 O and H 2 SO 4 /H 2 O systems.

Journal of Geophysical Research(D10) DOI: /JDCited by: Laboratory studies of sticking coefficients of H 2 O, HCl, Cl 2 and HNO 3 on ice and heterogeneous reactions of ClONO 2 with ice or HCl/ice have been performed in a fast flow reactor.

A quadrupole mass spectrometer with electron impact ionization was used as a detector. Measured sticking coefficients are: (+ −) for H 2 O, (+, −) for HCl, Cited by: Nitric acid initially condenses in the polar stratosphere to form supercooled solution droplets of mainly nitric acid and water with trace amounts of sulfuric acid.

Nitric acid dihydrate (NAD) and nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) later crystallize from this supercooled solution phase. Polar stratospheric clouds or PSCs, also known as nacreous clouds from nacre, or mother of pearl, due to its iridescence), are clouds in the winter polar stratosphere.

PSCs form at very high altitudes, between 15 and 25 km (ab to 80, feet). PSCs only form at very cold temperatures around ° C. Request PDF | Laboratory Evidence for Surface Nucleation of Solid Polar Stratospheric Cloud Particles | Nitric acid-containing cloud particles, known as polar stratospheric clouds, play an.

Start studying Holt Environmental Science Chapter 13 Review. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools. Formation of mixed-phase particles during the freezing of polar stratospheric ice clouds Anatoli Bogdan1,2,3*, Mario J.

Molina4, Heikki Tenhu2, Erwin Mayer5 and Thomas Loerting1* Polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) are extremely efficient at catalysing the transformation of photostable chlorine reservoirsFile Size: KB. 23, LARSEN ET AL.: POLAR STRATOSPHERIC CLOUD TEMPERATURE HISTORIES from lidar measurements [Browell et al., ] in addition to type 2 PSC water ice particles which form below the frost point.

Type lb PSCs are presumably liquid particles [Toon et al., ], and laboratory measurements and. As a case study of relevance to the atmosphere, we have investigated the reactions of the NOy species ClONO2, N2O5, and HNO3 on thin ice films representative of water-ice polar stratospheric clouds (type II PSCs).

Polar stratospheric clouds are clouds in the winter polar stratosphere at altitudes of 15,–25, m. They are best observed during civil twilight, when the Sun is between 1 and 6 degrees below the horizon, as well as in winter and in more northerly latitudes. One main type of PSC is made up mostly of supercooled droplets of water and nitric acid and is implicated in the formation of ozone holes.

The Appearance: Glowing brightly with vivid iridescent colors.The future of SPARC Don't just read about it - contribute! >> leave your comments and thoughts here > Read the SPARC co-chairs' thoughts on the.Polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) have long been recognised to play an important role in the destruction of stratospheric ozone via chlorine activation, dehydration and denitrifica-tion (for a detailed review and discussion see, for example, WMO,and references within).

PSCs are, however, Correspondence to: A. R. MacKenzie.